Review of the Parasa undulata Cai, 1983 species group with the first conifer-feeding larva for Limacodidae and descriptions of two new species from China and Taiwan Lepidoptera, Limacodidae.Report as inadecuate



 Review of the Parasa undulata Cai, 1983 species group with the first conifer-feeding larva for Limacodidae and descriptions of two new species from China and Taiwan Lepidoptera, Limacodidae.


Review of the Parasa undulata Cai, 1983 species group with the first conifer-feeding larva for Limacodidae and descriptions of two new species from China and Taiwan Lepidoptera, Limacodidae. - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Download or read this book online for free in PDF: Review of the Parasa undulata Cai, 1983 species group with the first conifer-feeding larva for Limacodidae and descriptions of two new species from China and Taiwan Lepidoptera, Limacodidae.
This article is from ZooKeys.AbstractAbstractAlthough the caterpillars are well-known for the stings and magnificent coloration, the systematics of Limacodidae is historically neglected and chaotic due to the difficulty in matching the larval with adult stages as well as the very conservative and convergent adult morphology. One of the biggest taxonomic problems surrounds a collective group from Southeastern Asia, termed the -green limacodid moths-, which harbours at least 90 species placed in the genus Parasa Walker, 1859 and 14 -subunits-. The P. undulata group was previously composed of 3 species from China and Taiwan, and characterized only by wing pattern. This species group is extensively studied herein with two new species described, i.e. P. viridiflammasp. n. Taiwan and P. minwangisp. n. S. China, and discovery of female genitalia of three species, presenting new phylogenetic insights in this potentially paraphyletic genus. In addition, one limacodid larva was found to be feeding exclusively on Picea Pinaceae in Taiwan. Its identity, Parasa pygmy Solovyev, 2010 in P. undulata group, is confirmed through matching its COI sequence to the adult. This discovery is also biologically significant because the previous known host breadth of Parasa was of polyphagy on various angiosperm plant families. This case, therefore, represents the first record of conifer-feeding behavior in this family as well as the first of specialized herbivory in the genus. Meanwhile, the background match between Picea leaves and larval coloration is shared with other Picea-feeding insects. This phenomenon is worth of further investigation in the aspect of convergent evolution of crypsis associated with a particular plant.



Author: Wu, Shipher; Chang, Weichun

Source: https://archive.org/







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