Vol 5: Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 5: Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome.


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This article is from Frontiers in Psychology, volume 5.AbstractObjective: The coordination of patient’s and therapist’s bodily movement – nonverbal synchrony – has been empirically shown to be associated with psychotherapy outcome. This finding was based on dynamic movement patterns of the whole body. The present paper is a new analysis of an existing dataset Ramseyer and Tschacher, 2011, which extends previous findings by differentiating movements pertaining to head and upper-body regions.Method: In a sample of 70 patients 37 female, 33 male treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic, we quantified nonverbal synchrony with an automated objective video-analysis algorithm motion energy analysis. Head- and body-synchrony was quantified during the initial 15 min of video-recorded therapy sessions. Micro-outcome was assessed with self-report post-session questionnaires provided by patients and their therapists. Macro-outcome was measured with questionnaires that quantified attainment of treatment goals and changes in experiencing and behavior at the end of therapy.Results: The differentiation of head- and body-synchrony showed that these two facets of motor coordination were differentially associated with outcome. Head-synchrony predicted global outcome of therapy, while body-synchrony did not, and body-synchrony predicted session outcome, while head-synchrony did not.Conclusion: The results pose an important amendment to previous findings, which showed that nonverbal synchrony embodied both outcome and interpersonal variables of psychotherapy dyads. The separation of head- and body-synchrony suggested that distinct mechanisms may operate in these two regions: Head-synchrony embodied phenomena with a long temporal extension overall therapy success, while body-synchrony embodied phenomena of a more immediate nature session-level success. More explorations with fine-grained analyses of synchronized phenomena in nonverbal behavior may shed additional light on the embodiment of psychotherapy process.



Author: Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

Source: https://archive.org/



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