NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20150016966: Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric DisordersReport as inadecuate



 NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20150016966: Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders


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The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders -acceptable given mitigations,- for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board HSRB determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood per person per year by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational within mission. Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as -accepted with monitoring- while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a -red- risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure see Table 1. While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so Whitmire et al, 2013. While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle -ignoring it- is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism on station. For the longer missions of the ISS, astronauts require a larger, more robust set of coping skills and more psychological support. Evidence of this are the number of BHP’s Operational Psychology Op Psy staff who have been awarded silver Snoopys by long duration astronauts†, in the statements of praise for the Op Psy and Family Support Office teams, and in the written and oral statements from flown astronauts regarding difficulty of longer missions and how much Op Psy helped.



Author: NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Source: https://archive.org/







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