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This paper attempts to show that the intellectual construct womens language is entirely justified on a political, ideological, and economic basis that stresses the fact that women have historically been victims of overt and covert discrimination and exploitation in our society. Linguistically speaking, however, a womens language seems not to exist in traditional strict terms, but rather as a rhetorical term used in the form of a synecdoche. Despite their incompleteness, two attempts of characterizing truly women languages, Nu Shu and Láadan, are discussed, underlining and recognizing their legitimate symbolic value as equalizing manoeuvres. Women have resorted to more subtle linguistic means to emerge as visible agents in our society. Linguistic resources go from a passive acceptance of the traditional all-inclusive generic masculine forms, through the equalizing use of both masculine and feminine markers, to the most progressive, liberal and controversial strategies of using feminizing forms, i.e. all-inclusive generic feminine forms. Womens struggle to overcome inequity and inequality is a legitimate endeavour which is leaving visible linguistic traces in our languages. Women are changing languages around the world.

Tipo de documento: Artículo - Article

Información adicional: Excepto que se establezca de otra forma, el contenido de esta revista cuenta con una licencia Creative Commons -reconocimiento, no comercial y sin obras derivadas- Colombia 2.5, que puede consultarse en http:-creativecommons.org-licenses-by-nc-nd-2.5-co-.

Palabras clave: women’s language, Nu Shu, Láadan, inclusive linguistic masculine forms, masculine and feminine linguistic forms, inclusive feminine linguistic forms





Source: http://www.bdigital.unal.edu.co


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Women’s language: a struggle to overcome inequality* Sergio Bolaños Cuellar sbolanosc@unal.edu.co Universidad Nacional de Colombia Departamento de Lingüística Abstract This paper attempts to show that the intellectual construct women’s language is entirely justified on a political, ideological, and economic basis that stresses the fact that women have historically been victims of overt (and covert) discrimination and exploitation in our society.
Linguistically speaking, however, a women’s language seems not to exist in traditional strict terms, but rather as a rhetorical term used in the form of a synecdoche.
Despite their incompleteness, two attempts of characterizing truly women languages, Nu Shu and Láadan, are discussed, underlining and recognizing their legitimate symbolic value as equalizing manoeuvres.
Women have resorted to more subtle linguistic means to emerge as visible agents in our society.
Linguistic resources go from a passive acceptance of the traditional all-inclusive generic masculine forms, through the equalizing use of both masculine and feminine markers, to the most progressive, liberal and controversial strategies of using feminizing forms, i.e.
all-inclusive generic feminine forms.
Women’s struggle to overcome inequity and inequality is a legitimate endeavour which is leaving visible linguistic traces in our languages.
Women are changing languages around the world. Key words: Women’s language, Nu Shu, Láadan, inclusive linguistic masculine forms, masculine and feminine linguistic forms, inclusive feminine linguistic forms. 1.
Women’s language Robin Lakoff’s seminal book Language and Women’s Place (1975) opened a new strand in linguistic studies when she called the attention to a traditionally * This paper is the result of research I had the opportunity to do during the seminar I attended on Language, Gender, and Culture under the guidance of Prof.
Juliane House at the University of Hamburg (Summer 2004). * Artículo reci...






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