Vol 5: Long-term memory-based control of attention in multi-step tasks requires working memory: evidence from domain-specific interference.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 5: Long-term memory-based control of attention in multi-step tasks requires working memory: evidence from domain-specific interference.


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This article is from Frontiers in Psychology, volume 5.AbstractEvidence for long-term memory LTM-based control of attention has been found during the execution of highly practiced multi-step tasks. However, does LTM directly control for attention or are working memory WM processes involved? In the present study, this question was investigated with a dual-task paradigm. Participants executed either a highly practiced visuospatial sensorimotor task speed stacking or a verbal task high-speed poem reciting, while maintaining visuospatial or verbal information in WM. Results revealed unidirectional and domain-specific interference. Neither speed stacking nor high-speed poem reciting was influenced by WM retention. Stacking disrupted the retention of visuospatial locations, but did not modify memory performance of verbal material letters. Reciting reduced the retention of verbal material substantially whereas it affected the memory performance of visuospatial locations to a smaller degree. We suggest that the selection of task-relevant information from LTM for the execution of overlearned multi-step tasks recruits domain-specific WM.



Author: Foerster, Rebecca M.; Carbone, Elena; Schneider, Werner X.

Source: https://archive.org/







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