Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3-H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopesReport as inadecuate




Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3-H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopes - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Virology Journal

, 7:363

First Online: 07 December 2010Received: 16 September 2010Accepted: 07 December 2010

Abstract

BackgroundMultiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect humans and have the potential to cause a pandemic. Therefore, new influenza vaccines to prevent the co-existence of multiple subtypes within a host and cross-species transmission of influenza are urgently needed.

MethodsHere we report a multi-epitope DNA vaccine targeted towards multiple subtypes of the influenza virus. The protective hemagglutinin HA antigens from H5-H7-H9 subtypes were screened for MHC II class-restricted epitopes overlapping with predicted B cell epitopes. We then constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine, pV-H3-EHA-H1, based on HA antigens from human influenza H3-H1 subtypes combined with the H5-H7-H9 subtype Th-B epitope box.

ResultsEpitope-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were significantly higher in the multi-epitope DNA group than in other vaccine and control groups P < 0.05. The multi-epitope group significantly enhanced Th2 cell responses as determined by cytokine assays. The survival rate of mice given the multi-epitope vaccine was the highest among the vaccine groups, but it was not significantly different compared to those given single antigen expressing pV-H1HA1 vaccine and dual antigen expressing pV-H3-H1 vaccine P > 0.05. No measurable virus titers were detected in the lungs of the multi-epitope immunized group. The unique multi-epitope DNA vaccine enhanced virus-specific antibody and cellular immunity as well as conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A-New Caledonia-20-99 H1N1 influenza strain in mice.

ConclusionsThis approach may be a promising strategy for developing a universal influenza vaccine to prevent multiple subtypes of influenza virus and to induce long-term protective immune against cross-species transmission.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1743-422X-7-363 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Lei Tan - Huijun Lu - Dan Zhang - Mingyao Tian - Bo Hu - Zhuoyue Wang - Ningyi Jin

Source: https://link.springer.com/



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