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Christina A. Nisson ; Dolores Albarracín ;Acta de Investigación PsicológicaPsychological Research Records 2015, 5 1

Author: Allison Earl

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=358941542005


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Acta de Investigación Psicológica Psychological Research Records ISSN: 2007-4832 actapsicologicaunam@gmail.com Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México México Earl, Allison; Nisson, Christina A.; Albarracín, Dolores Stigma Cues Increase Self-Conscious Emotions and Decrease Likelihood of Attention to Information about Preventing Stigmatized Health Issues Acta de Investigación Psicológica - Psychological Research Records, vol.
5, núm.
1, abril, 2015, pp.
1860-1871 Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Distrito Federal, México Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=358941542005 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative ACTA DE INVESTIGACIÓN PSICOLÓGICA, 2015, 5 (1), 1860 - 1871 Stigma Cues Increase Self-Conscious Emotions and Decrease Likelihood of Attention to Information about Preventing Stigmatized Health Issues Allison Earl1, Christina A.
Nisson, & Dolores Albarracín* University of Michigan, * University of Pennsylvania Abstract Health communications are only effective if target audiences actually receive the messages.
One potential barrier to effective health communication is the potential stigma of attending to health information, particularly for stigmatizing health issues.
The purpose of the present paper was to examine when participants report self-conscious emotions (e.g., shame, embarrassment) in response to health communications, as well as likelihood of reading health information associated with these emotions.
Across three studies, participants read information about preventing diseases that are either highly stigmatized or non-stigmatized.
Increased accessibility of stigma cues by (a) manipulating the perceived absence vs.
presence of others, or (b) measuring lower vs.
higher rejecti...





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