Socio-economic inequity in demand for insecticide-treated nets, in-door residual house spraying, larviciding and fogging in SudanReport as inadecuate




Socio-economic inequity in demand for insecticide-treated nets, in-door residual house spraying, larviciding and fogging in Sudan - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Malaria Journal

, 4:62

First Online: 15 December 2005Received: 29 August 2005Accepted: 15 December 2005

Abstract

BackgroundIn order to optimally prioritize and use public and private budgets for equitable malaria vector control, there is a need to determine the level and determinants of consumer demand for different vector control tools.

ObjectivesTo determine the demand from people of different socio-economic groups for indoor residual house-spraying IRHS, insecticide-treated nets ITNs, larviciding with chemicals LWC, and space spraying-fogging SS and the disease control implications of the result.

MethodsRatings and levels of willingness-to-pay WTP for the vector control tools were determined using a random cross-sectional sample of 720 householdes drawn from two states. WTP was elicited using the bidding game. An asset-based socio-economic status SES index was used to explore whether WTP was related to SES of the respondents.

ResultsIRHS received the highest proportion of highest preferred rating 41.0% followed by ITNs 23.1%. However, ITNs had the highest mean WTP followed by IRHS, while LWC had the least. The regression analysis showed that SES was positively and statistically significantly related to WTP across the four vector control tools and that the respondents- rating of IRHS and ITNs significantly explained their levels of WTP for the two tools.

ConclusionPeople were willing to pay for all the vector-control tools, but the demand for the vector control tools was related to the SES of the respondents. Hence, it is vital that there are public policies and financing mechanisms to ensure equitable provision and utilisation of vector control tools, as well as protecting the poor from cost-sharing arrangements.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1475-2875-4-62 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Obinna Onwujekwe - El-Fatih Mohamed Malik - Sara Hassan Mustafa - Abraham Mnzava

Source: https://link.springer.com/



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