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THEORIA. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 2010, 25 2

Author: Larrie D. FERREIRO

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=339730812009


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THEORIA.
Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia ISSN: 0495-4548 theoria@ehu.es Universidad del País Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea España FERREIRO, Larrie D. The Aristotelian Heritage in Early Naval Architecture, From the Venice Arsenal to the French Navy, 1500-1700 THEORIA.
Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia, vol.
25, núm.
2, 2010, pp.
227241 Universidad del País Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea Donostia-San Sebastián, España Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=339730812009 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative The Aristotelian Heritage in Early Naval Architecture, From the Venice Arsenal to the French Navy, 1500-1700* Larrie D.
FERREIRO Recibido: 8.2.2010 Versión final: 17.5.2010 BIBLID [0495-4548 (2010) 25: 68; pp.
227-241] ABSTRACT: This paper examines the Aristotelian roots of the mechanics of naval architecture, beginning with Mechanical Problems, through its various interpretations by Renaissance mathematicians including Vettor Fausto and Galileo at the Venice Arsenal, and culminating in the first synthetic works of naval architecture by the French navy professor Paul Hoste at the end of the seventeenth century. Keywords: naval architecture; Aristotle; Archimedes; mechanics . 1.
Introduction Naval architecture has played a small but strategically vital role in the development of rational mechanics, yet until lately it has received scant attention from historians.
Recent works on the development of naval architecture during the Scientific Revolution have focused on its origins in Archimedes’ theorems for displacement and stability (Nowacki, 2001; Nowacki and Ferreiro, 2003).
Yet some of the first theoretical problems in naval architecture, ...





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