Lipothymia and Syncope—Aetiology and Outcome in a Prehospital Setting: A Retrospective StudyReport as inadecuate




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ISRN Emergency MedicineVolume 2012 2012, Article ID 705325, 6 pages

Research Article

Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark

Mobile Emergency Care Unit, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark

Received 26 September 2012; Accepted 24 October 2012

Academic Editors: A. Banerjee, O. Karcioglu, and W. Kloeck

Copyright © 2012 Stine T. Zwisler and Søren Mikkelsen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. A firm aetiology of lipothymia or syncope can be difficult to establish prehospitally. The aim of the study was to investigate patients initially assigned the diagnosis of lipothymia or syncope prehospitally and establish the aetiology of their condition either based on prehospital or in-hospital medical records. Methods. From May 1, 2006 to April 30, 2010, all patients receiving the diagnosis of lipothymia or syncope by the MECU were investigated. If admitted to hospital, the patients’ medical records were investigated to confirm the prehospital diagnosis. Results. Within 17980 MECU runs registered, 678 were assignments in which the patients were diagnosed with lipothymia or syncope 3.8%. 578 patients 85% were admitted to hospital. 278 of the patients were discharged directly from the emergency department, while 271 were admitted to a ward. 112 patients refused treatment offered by the MECU or at the emergency department, died, or were left at the scene following treatment. 17 were lost to followup. Of all patients investigated, 299 were discharged with the diagnosis of lipothymia or syncope. 250 patients were discharged with other diagnoses. Conclusions. In 44% of the patients presenting with lipothymia or syncope, no other diagnosis was established at the hospital, and no explanatory aetiology was found.





Author: Stine T. Zwisler and Søren Mikkelsen

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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