Psychosocial factors associated with smoking and drinking among Japanese early adolescent boys and girls: Cross-sectional studyReport as inadecuate




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BioPsychoSocial Medicine

, 1:13

First Online: 04 July 2007Received: 18 February 2007Accepted: 04 July 2007

Abstract

BackgroundSmoking and drinking alcohol among early adolescents are serious public health concerns, but few studies have been conducted in Japan to assess their prevalence and etiology. A regional survey was conducted in eight schools in two Japanese school districts to identify psychosocial factors associated with smoking and drinking behaviors for boys and girls.

MethodsJunior high school students from seventh to ninth grades N = 2,923 completed a self-reported questionnaire between December 2002 and March 2003. Relationships between psychosocial variables i.e., self-assertive efficacy to resist peer pressure, parental involvement, school adjustment, and deviant peer influence and smoking and drinking were investigated using logistic regression analyses and path analyses.

ResultsSmoking in the last six months was significantly more prevalent in boys 7.9% than girls 5.1%. The prevalence of drinking in the last six months was similar in boys 23.7% and girls 21.8%. Self-efficacy to resist peer pressure was negatively associated with both smoking and drinking among both boys and girls and provided both direct and indirect effects through deviant peer influence. Parental involvement showed indirect effects through school adjustment and-or deviant peer influence to both smoking among both boys and girls and drinking among girls, although parental involvement showed direct effects on smoking only for boys. School adjustment was negatively associated with smoking among both boys and girls and drinking among girls.

ConclusionThese findings suggest that self-assertive efficacy to resist peer pressure, parental involvement, school adjustment and deviant peer influence are potentially important factors that could be addressed by programs to prevent smoking and-or drinking among early adolescent boys and girls in Japan.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1751-0759-1-13 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Mikayo Ando - Takashi Asakura - Shinichiro Ando - Bruce G Simons-Morton

Source: https://link.springer.com/



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