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Journal of Immunology Research - Volume 2014 2014, Article ID 483960, 12 pages -

Review Article

Department of General Pathology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland

Department of Ophthalmology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland

Department of Histology and Embryology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland

Received 28 April 2014; Revised 18 July 2014; Accepted 1 August 2014; Published 4 September 2014

Academic Editor: Xiao-Feng Yang

Copyright © 2014 Milosz P. Kawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration AMD is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch’s membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system CS is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease.





Author: Milosz P. Kawa, Anna Machalinska, Dorota Roginska, and Boguslaw Machalinski

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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