Genomic ancestry and the social pathways leading to major depression in adulthood: the mediating effect of socioeconomic position and discriminationReport as inadecuate




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BMC Psychiatry

, 16:308

Mood disorders

Abstract

BackgroundEvidence suggests that there is an association between ethnicity-skin color and depression; however, many contextual and individual variables, like sense of discrimination and socioeconomic position SEP, might influence the direction of this association.
We assessed the association between African ancestry and major depression among young adults that have been followed-up since birth in a Southern Brazilian city, and the mediating effect of SEP and discrimination.

MethodsIn 1982, all hospital deliveries in Pelotas Southern Brazil were identified; liveborns were examined and their mothers interviewed n = 5914.
In 2012–13, at 30 years of age, we used the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview MINI for major depression diagnosis.
In addition, DNA samples were genotyped for approximately 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs using Illumina CA, USA HumanOmni2.5-8v1 array.
Genomic ancestry estimation was based on approximately 370 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs mutually available for the Pelotas cohort and selected samples used as reference panels of the HapMap and Human Genome Diversity HGDP.
We estimated prevalence ratios PR using Poisson regression models and evaluated the association between percentage of African ancestry and major depression.
We used G-computation for mediation analysis.

ResultsAt 30 years, 3576 individuals were evaluated for major depression prevalence = 7.9 %.
Only individuals in the highest SEP, who had a percentage of African ancestry between >5–30 % and >30 % had a prevalence of major depression 2.16 PR = 2.16 95 % CI 1.05–4.45 and 2.74 PR = 2.74 95 % CI 1.06–7.06 times higher, than those with 5 % or less, respectively.
Among these subjects, sense of discrimination by skin color, captured 84 % of the association between African ancestry and major depression.

ConclusionSEP is an important effect modifier of the positive association between African ancestry and major depression.
In addition, this association is predominantly mediated by the sense of feeling discriminated by skin color.

KeywordsMajor depression Genomic ancestry Socioeconomic position Discrimination Brazil Cohort AbbreviationsCIConfidence interval

HGDPHuman genome diversity project

IQRInterquartile ranges

MINIMini international neuropsychiatric interview

NDENatural direct effect

NIENatural indirect effect

PRPrevalence ratio

SDStandard deviation

SEPSocioeconomic position

SNPSingle nucleotide polymorphism

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s12888-016-1015-2 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Christian Loret de Mola - Fernando Pires Hartwig - Helen Gonçalves - Luciana de Avila Quevedo - Ricardo Pinheiro - Denise

Source: https://link.springer.com/



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