Sexy Mouth Odour Male Oral Gland Pheromone in the Grain Beetle Parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus Förster Hymenoptera: PteromalidaeReport as inadecuate




Sexy Mouth Odour Male Oral Gland Pheromone in the Grain Beetle Parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus Förster Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

BioMed Research International - Volume 2015 2015, Article ID 216952, 8 pages -

Research ArticleInstitute for Zoology, Animal Ecology 220c, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany

Received 1 September 2015; Accepted 29 September 2015

Academic Editor: Giovanni Benelli

Copyright © 2015 Kerstin König et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Throughout the animal kingdom, sexual pheromones are used for the attraction of mates and as courtship signals but also enable sexual isolation between species. In the parasitic wasp Lariophagus distinguendus, male courtship behaviour consisting of wing fanning, antennal stroking of the female antenna, and head nodding stimulates female receptivity leading to copulation. Recently L. distinguendus was reported to consist of two different lineages, which are sexually isolated because males fail to elicit receptivity in foreign females. It is unclear, however, which part of the courtship behaviour triggers female receptivity and therefore could be a mechanism causing sexual isolation. Here we show that in L. distinguendus a nonvolatile male oral pheromone is essential to release the female receptivity signal. In contrast, male wing fanning and antennal contact play a minor role. Additionally, the composition of the oral pheromone depends on the developmental host and females learn the composition upon emergence from the host substrate. These results will enable more detailed work on oral sexual pheromones to answer the question of how they are involved in the speciation process of L. distinguendus and other parasitoid species, for a better understanding of the huge biodiversity in this group.





Author: Kerstin König, Lucy Seeger, and Johannes L. M. Steidle

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



DOWNLOAD PDF




Related documents