Early rise in circulating endothelial protein C receptor correlates with poor outcome in severe sepsis.: Profiling soluble EPCR upon severe sepsisReport as inadecuate




Early rise in circulating endothelial protein C receptor correlates with poor outcome in severe sepsis.: Profiling soluble EPCR upon severe sepsis - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

* Corresponding author 1 Immunointervention dans les allo et xénotransplantations 2 Service de Réanimation Médicale Polyvalente 3 Biostatistique, Recherche Clinique et Mesures Subjectives en Santé 4 Plateforme de Biométrie, Cellule de promotion de la recherche clinique

Abstract : PURPOSE: The endothelial protein C receptor EPCR negatively regulates the coagulopathy and inflammatory response in sepsis. Mechanisms controlling the expression of cell-bound and circulating soluble EPCR sEPCR are still unclear. Moreover, the clinical impact of EPCR shedding and its potential value to predict sepsis progression and outcome remain to be established. METHODS: We investigated the time course of plasma sEPCR over the 5 first days D of severe sepsis in 40 patients. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed when comparing sEPCR at admission D1 to healthy volunteers and to patients with vasculitis. We report that the kinetics profile of plasma sEPCR in patients was almost stable at the onset of sepsis with no change from D1 to D4 and then a significant decrease at D5. This pattern of release was consistently observed whatever the level of sEPCR at D1. Characteristics of patients or of infections except Gram negative had no or little critical influence on the sEPCR profile. However, we found that sEPCR kinetics was clearly associated with patient-s outcome D28 survival. We demonstrate that a significant but moderate



Author: Christophe Guitton - Nathalie Gérard - Véronique Sébille - Cédric Bretonnière - Olivier Zambon - Daniel Villers - Béatrice

Source: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/



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