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Joni N. Saby ; Andrew N. Meltzoff ;International Journal of Psychological Research 2013, 6

Author: Peter J. Marshall

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=299029205003


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International Journal of Psychological Research ISSN: 2011-2084 ijpr@usbmed.edu.co Universidad de San Buenaventura Colombia Marshall, Peter J.; Saby, Joni N.; Meltzoff, Andrew N. Imitation and the Developing Social Brain: Infants’ Somatotopic EEG Patterns for Acts of Self and Other International Journal of Psychological Research, vol.
6, 2013, pp.
22-29 Universidad de San Buenaventura Medellín, Colombia Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=299029205003 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative Imitation and the Developing Social Brain: Infants’ Somatotopic EEG Patterns for Acts of Self and Other Imitación y desarrollo del cerebro social: Patrones somatotópicos del EEG de niños para sus propios actos y de otros. Research a, Peter J.
Marshall * , Joni N.
Saby a , Andrew N.
Meltzoff a Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, United States b Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, United States b Article history: Received: 10-09-2010 Revised: 10-10-2013 Accepted: 21-10-2013 ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT A leading question in developmental social-cognitive neuroscience concerns the nature and function of neural links between action perception and production in early human development. Here we document a somatotopic pattern of activity of the sensorimotor EEG mu rhythm in 14month-old infants.
EEG was recorded during interactive trials in which infants activated a novel object using their own hands or feet (“execution” trials) and watched an experimenter use her hands or feet to achieve the same goal (“observation” trials).
At central electrodes overlying sensorimotor hand areas (C3-C4), mu rhythm power was reduced (indicating greater cortical...





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