Projecting an academic identity in some reflective genres Report as inadecuate




Projecting an academic identity in some reflective genres - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Ibérica 2011, 21

Author: Ken Hyland

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=287023883002


Teaser



Ibérica ISSN: 1139-7241 iberica@aelfe.org Asociación Europea de Lenguas para Fines Específicos España Hyland, Ken Projecting an academic identity in some reflective genres Ibérica, núm.
21, 2011, pp.
9-30 Asociación Europea de Lenguas para Fines Específicos Cádiz, España Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=287023883002 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative 01 IBERICA 21.qxp:Iberica 13 10-03-11 17:18 Página 9 Projecting an academic identity in some reflective genres Ken Hyland The University of Hong Kong (China) khyland@hku.hk Abstract Research on academic writing has long stressed the connection between writing and the creation of an author’s identity (Ivanič, 1998; Hyland, 2010).
Identity is said to be created from the texts we engage in and the linguistic choices we make, thus relocating it from hidden processes of cognition to its social construction in discourse.
Issues of agency and conformity, stability and change, remain controversial, however.
Some writers question whether there is an unchanging self lurking behind such discourse and suggest that identity is a “performance” (see for instance Butler, 1990) while others see identity as the product of dominant discourses tied to institutional practices (Foucault, 1972).
All this has been of particular interest to teachers and researchers of EAP because students and academics alike often feel uncomfortably positioned, even alienated, by the conventions of academic discourse.
They sometimes complain that the voice they are forced to use requires them to “talk like a book” by adopting a formal and coldly analytical persona. In this paper I want to explore how we construct an identity in three rather neglected academic genres wh...





Related documents