Lateral transfer of tetrahymanol-synthesizing genes has allowed multiple diverse eukaryote lineages to independently adapt to environments without oxygenReport as inadecuate




Lateral transfer of tetrahymanol-synthesizing genes has allowed multiple diverse eukaryote lineages to independently adapt to environments without oxygen - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Biology Direct

, 7:5

First Online: 01 February 2012Received: 16 December 2011Accepted: 01 February 2012

Abstract

Sterols are key components of eukaryotic cellular membranes that are synthesized by multi-enzyme pathways that require molecular oxygen. Because prokaryotes fundamentally lack sterols, it is unclear how the vast diversity of bacterivorous eukaryotes that inhabit hypoxic environments obtain, or synthesize, sterols. Here we show that tetrahymanol, a triterpenoid that does not require molecular oxygen for its biosynthesis, likely functions as a surrogate of sterol in eukaryotes inhabiting oxygen-poor environments. Genes encoding the tetrahymanol synthesizing enzyme squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase were found from several phylogenetically diverged eukaryotes that live in oxygen-poor environments and appear to have been laterally transferred among such eukaryotes.

ReviewersThis article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste and Eugene Koonin.

Keywordseukaryotes lateral gene transfer phagocytosis sterols tetrahymanol Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1745-6150-7-5 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Kiyotaka Takishita - Yoshito Chikaraishi - Michelle M Leger - Eunsoo Kim - Akinori Yabuki - Naohiko Ohkouchi - Andrew J R

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1745-6150-7-5







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