Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to VaccinationReport as inadecuate




Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to Vaccination - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology - Volume 2016 2016, Article ID 1752379, 6 pages -

Research Article

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53726, USA

Department of Research, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC 20024, USA

Department of Global Health, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 981985, USA

Received 3 October 2015; Accepted 4 January 2016

Academic Editor: Louise Hafner

Copyright © 2016 Emily E. Fay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. The 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults over 65 years of age and younger adults with certain medical conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC state insufficient evidence to recommend routine pneumococcal vaccination during pregnancy, but the vaccine is indicated for pregnant women with certain medical conditions. We designed this project to gauge obstetrics and gynecology OB-GYN resident knowledge of maternal pneumococcal vaccination. Methods. We administered a 22-question survey to OB-GYN residents about maternal pneumococcal vaccination. We performed descriptive analysis for each question. Results. 238 OB-GYN residents responded. Overall, 69.3% of residents reported receiving vaccination education and 86.0% reported having ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. Most residents knew that asplenia 78.2%, pulmonary disease 77.3%, and HIV-AIDS 69.4% are indications for vaccination but less knew that cardiovascular disease 45.0%, diabetes 35.8%, asthma 42.8%, nephrotic syndrome 19.7%, and renal failure 33.6% are also indications for vaccination. Conclusion. OB-GYN residents are taught about vaccines and have ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. However, knowledge of indications for pneumococcal vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. Likely, the opportunity to vaccinate at-risk pregnant patients is being missed.





Author: Emily E. Fay, Kara K. Hoppe, Jay Schulkin, and Linda O. Eckert

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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