Fecal Microbiota and Diet of Children with Chronic ConstipationReport as inadecuate




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International Journal of Pediatrics - Volume 2016 2016, Article ID 6787269, 8 pages -

Research Article

Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego 1235, University City, 50670-901 Recife, PE, Brazil

Mother-Child Department, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego 1235, University City, 50670-901 Recife, PE, Brazil

Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Immunopathology Keizo Asami LIKA, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego 1235, University City, 50670-901 Recife, PE, Brazil

Received 29 November 2015; Accepted 18 May 2016

Academic Editor: Samuel Menahem

Copyright © 2016 Joyce Gomes de Moraes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Many factors explain dysbiosis in chronic constipation CC, such as a low-fiber diet. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of constipated and nonconstipated children and their intake frequencies of food. Methods. This observational study included 79 children M-F 43-36 aged six to 36 months divided into two groups: cases 39 constipated children and controls 40 nonconstipated children. We used a structured form to collect demographic variables, conducted anthropometric assessment, and collected food intake frequency data. The fecal microbiota of the stool samples was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction PCR using the fluorophore SYBR® Green. Results. Constipated children had a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus per milligram of stool than nonconstipated children, but the concentration of Bifidobacterium per milligram of stool and the intake of fruits, vegetables , and junk food of the two groups did not differ. Constipated children consumed more dairy products ; , were more frequently delivered via caesarean section 69.2%, were weaned earlier median: 120; , and had a family history of constipation 71.8%. Conclusions. Children with CC have a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus in their stools and consume more dairy products.





Author: Joyce Gomes de Moraes, Maria Eugênia Farias de Almeida Motta, Monique Ferraz de Sá Beltrão, Taciana Lima Salviano, and Gise

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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