Basic life support training for single rescuers efficiently augments their willingness to make early emergency calls with no available help: a cross-over questionnaire surveyReport as inadecuate




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Journal of Intensive Care

, 2:28

First Online: 24 April 2014Received: 28 November 2013Accepted: 27 March 2014

Abstract

BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate effects of basic life support BLS training on willingness of single rescuers to make emergency calls during out-of-hospital cardiac arrests OHCAs with no available help from others.

MethodsA cross-over questionnaire survey was conducted with two questionnaires. Questionnaires were administered before and after two BLS courses in fire departments. One questionnaire included two scenarios which simulate OHCAs occurring in situations where help from other rescuers is available Scenario-M and not available Scenario-S. The conventional BLS course was designed for multiple rescuers Course-M, and the other was designed for single rescuers Course-S.

ResultsOf 2,312 respondents, 2,218 95.9% answered all questions and were included in the analysis. Although both Course-M and Course-S significantly augmented willingness to make early emergency calls not only in Scenario-M but also in Scenario-S, the willingness for Scenario-M after training course was significantly higher in respondents of Course-S than in those of Course-M odds ratio 1.706, 95% confidential interval 1.301–2.237. Multiple logistic regression analysis for Scenario-M disclosed that post training adjusted odds ratio 11.6, 95% confidence interval 7.84–18.0, age 0.99, 0.98–0.99, male gender 1.77, 1.39–2.24, prior BLS experience of at least three times 1.46, 1.25–2.59, and time passed since most recent training during 3 years or less 1.80, 1.25–2.59 were independently associated with willingness to make early emergency calls and that type of BLS course was not independently associated with willingness. Therefore, both Course-M and Course-S similarly augmented willingness in Scenario-M. However, in multiple logistic regression analyses for Scenario-S, Course-S was independently associated with willingness to make early emergency calls in Scenario-S 1.26, 1.00–1.57, indicating that Course-S more efficiently augmented willingness. Moreover, post training 2.30, 1.86–2.83 and male gender 1.26, 1.02–1.57 were other independent factors associated with willingness in Scenario-S.

ConclusionsBLS courses designed for single rescuers with no help available from others are likely to augment willingness to make early emergency calls more efficiently than conventional BLS courses designed for multiple rescuers.

KeywordsEmergency call Basic life support Willingness Bystander Training course Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-2052-0492-2-28 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Keiko Hirose - Miki Enami - Hiroki Matsubara - Takahisa Kamikura - Yutaka Takei - Hideo Inaba

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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