Evolution of seismic signals and slip patterns along subduction zones: insights from a friction lab scale experiment.Report as inadecuate




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1 LGIT - Laboratoire de Géophysique Interne et Tectonophysique

Abstract : Continuous GPS and broadband seismic monitoring have revealed a variety of disparate slip patterns especially in shallow dipping subduction zones, among which regular earthquakes, slow slip events and silent quakes1,2. Slow slip events are sometimes accompanied by Non Volcanic Tremors NVT, which origin remains unclear3, either related to fluid migration or to friction. The present understanding of the whole menagerie of slip patterns is based upon numerical simulations imposing ad hoc values of the rate and state parameters a and b4-6 derived from the temperature dependence of a and b of a wet granite gouge7. Here we investigate the influence of the cumulative slip on the frictional and acoustic patterns of a lab scale subduction zone. Shallow loud earthquakes stick-slip events, medium depth slow, deeper silent quakes smooth sliding oscillations and deepest steady-state creep continuous sliding are reproduced by the ageing of contact interface with cumulative displacement8. The Acoustic Emission evolves with cumulative displacement and interface ageing, following a trend from strong impulsive events, similar to earthquake seismic signals, to a collection of smaller amplitude and longer duration signals, similar to Non Volcanic Tremors. NVT emerge as the recollection of the local unstable behaviour of the contact interface globally evolving towards the stable sliding regime.

Keywords : Friction Acosutic Emission Silent event Non Volcanic Tremor





Author: Christophe Voisin - Jean-Robert Grasso - Eric Larose - François Renard -

Source: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/



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