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Biogeochemistry

, Volume 114, Issue 1–3, pp 121–134

First Online: 02 September 2012Received: 16 July 2012Accepted: 01 August 2012DOI: 10.1007-s10533-012-9782-4

Cite this article as: Peel, J.L., Haeuber, R., Garcia, V. et al. Biogeochemistry 2013 114: 121. doi:10.1007-s10533-012-9782-4

Abstract

Nitrogen oxides NOx are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOx is also formed by lightning strikes and wildland fires and is also emitted by soil. Reduced nitrogen e.g., ammonia, NH3 is also emitted by various sources, including fertilizer application and animal waste decomposition. Nitrogen oxides, ozone O3 and fine particulate matter PM2.5 pollution related to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen N and other pollutants can cause premature death and a variety of serious health effects. Climate change is expected to impact how N-related pollutants affect human health. For example, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns are projected to both lengthen the O3 season and intensify high O3 episodes in some areas. Other climate-related changes may increase the atmospheric release of N compounds through impacts on wildfire regimes, soil emissions, and biogenic emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. This paper examines the potential human health implications of climate change and N cycle interactions related to ambient air pollution.

KeywordsNitrogen oxides Ozone Air pollution Human health  Download fulltext PDF



Author: Jennifer L. Peel - Richard Haeuber - Valerie Garcia - Armistead G. Russell - Lucas Neas

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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