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fuel cell, mass transport, porous media, effective diffusivity

Pant, Lalit M

Supervisor and department: Secanell Gallart, Marc Mechanical Engineering Mitra, Sushanta K Mechanical Engineering

Examining committee member and department: Luo, Jingli Chemical and Materials Engineering Kumar, Amit Mechanical Engineering

Department: Department of Mechanical Engineering

Specialization:

Date accepted: 2011-08-30T20:42:46Z

Graduation date: 2011-11

Degree: Master of Science

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: Porous media is an integral part of polymer electrolyte fuel cell PEMFC electrodes. In this study, an experimental setup is presented to investigate convective and diffusive mass transport in porous media of fuel cell electrodes. A new theoretical model was developed in order to correct for inconsistencies in current models. Based on the new model, a new data extraction technique was used to obtain permeability and Knudsen diffusivity of a porous media from steady state pure convection measurements. The model was also used to obtain effective diffusivity of porous media from mass transport experiments. Using the obtained transport properties, the models were used to predict mass transport in the electrodes under different operating conditions. Preliminary comparisons of experimental and theoretical predictions show that the new mass transport model is capable of predicting mass transport in the electrode accurately. The results concluded that the traditionally used Bruggeman correlation overpredicts the electrode effective diffusivity by as much as 3-4 times.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3WP5Q

Rights: License granted by Lalit Pant lalit@ualberta.ca on 2011-08-26T18:16:54Z GMT: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Author: Pant, Lalit M

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/



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