Improvement of quality of life and survival using self-expandable metal stent placement for severe malignant stenosis of the gastric body: a case reportReport as inadecuate




Improvement of quality of life and survival using self-expandable metal stent placement for severe malignant stenosis of the gastric body: a case report - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Journal of Medical Case Reports

, 6:315

First Online: 19 September 2012Received: 03 March 2012Accepted: 19 July 2012DOI: 10.1186-1752-1947-6-315

Cite this article as: Kumagai, H., Nio, K., Shirakawa, T. et al. J Med Case Reports 2012 6: 315. doi:10.1186-1752-1947-6-315

Abstract

IntroductionAdvanced gastric carcinoma often decreases quality of life because of upper gastrointestinal tract stenosis. Self-expandable metal stents have been thought to be an effective, minimally invasive treatment for stenosis. However, the effectiveness of self-expandable metal stent placement for carcinomatous stenosis of the gastric body and antrum has not been clarified, and there have been few reports of such cases.

Case presentationA 74-year-old Japanese woman developed stenosis of the gastric body and antrum caused by advanced gastric cancer during first-line chemotherapy. She developed weight loss and poor nutrition due to inadequate intake. Self-expandable metal stent placement for stenosis of the gastric body and antrum ameliorated her symptoms rapidly and improved her general condition and quality of life. Eight days after self-expandable metal stent placement, second-line chemotherapy could be administered safely. Oral intake and nutritional status were maintained for 117 days after self-expandable metal stent placement, and she died of gastric cancer 176 days after self-expandable metal stent placement and initiation of second-line chemotherapy.

ConclusionsSelf-expandable metal stent placement for carcinomatous stenosis in the gastric body and antrum could be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with inadequate oral uptake. It may provide rapid improvement of the patient’s general condition and oral intake with minimal complications, comparatively long-term symptom relief, and a survival benefit by allowing second-line chemotherapy.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1752-1947-6-315 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Hozumi Kumagai - Kenta Nio - Tsuyoshi Shirakawa - Keita Uchino - Hitoshi Kusaba - Taichi Isobe - Masato Komoda - Shingo Ta

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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