The effects of mid-life socioeconomic disadvantage and perceived social support on trajectories of subsequent depressive symptoms among older Taiwanese womenReport as inadecuate




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BMC Public Health

, 14:384

Health behavior, health promotion and society

Abstract

BackgroundScant research has taken a life-course perspective to explore the longitudinal impact of socioeconomic disadvantage and perceived social support on the psychological well-being of older women. We sought to explore whether socioeconomic disadvantage and perceived social support in mid-life are associated with subsequent depressive symptomatology among older Taiwanese women.

MethodsThis study was based on data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging conducted on a nationally representative sample n = 1,073 of women aged 50 and above with a 12-year follow up. Mid-life socioeconomic disadvantage was assessed by socioeconomic status SES i.e., educational attainment, major lifetime occupation in adulthood, and employment status and economic strain. Perceived social support included three dimensions: listening, caring, and sick care. We used the short form of the Center of Epidemiological Studies-Depression CES-D scale that measures depressive symptomatology within two domains negative affect and lack of positive affect. Growth curve models were employed to predict the relationships between mid-life socioeconomic disadvantage, perceived social support, and subsequent depressive trajectories, controlling for aging effects.

ResultsMultivariate analyses demonstrated older women in a socioeconomic disadvantaged position are more likely to report higher initial levels of depressive symptoms in both domains; lack of formal education did not exacerbate depressive symptoms in the lack of positive affect domain over time. In addition, mid-life perceived positive social support in caring and sick care was associated with lower initial levels of depressive symptoms in both domains.

ConclusionsOur results suggest independent effects of mid-life socioeconomic disadvantage and perceived social support on subsequent depressive symptomatology among older Taiwanese women.

KeywordsDepressive symptoms Socioeconomic Status SES Life-course Social support Older women Taiwan Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1471-2458-14-384 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Yun-Yu Chen - Chi Chiao - Kate Ksobiech

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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