The relationship between school physical activity policy and objectively measured physical activity of elementary school students: a multilevel model analysisReport as inadecuate




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Archives of Public Health

, 72:20

First Online: 16 June 2014Received: 03 October 2013Accepted: 31 March 2014DOI: 10.1186-2049-3258-72-20

Cite this article as: Faulkner, G., Zeglen, L., Leatherdale, S. et al. Arch Public Health 2014 72: 20. doi:10.1186-2049-3258-72-20

Abstract

BackgroundThere is evidence of school level variability in the physical activity of children and youth. Less is known about factors that may contribute to this variation. The purpose of this study was to examine if the school health environment Healthy Physical Environment, Instruction and Programs, Supportive Social Environment, and Community Partnerships is associated with objectively measured time spent in light to vigorous physical activity among a sample of Toronto children.

MethodsThe sample comprised 856 grade 5 and 6 students from 18 elementary schools in Toronto, Ontario. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to examine the impact of school physical activity policy on students’ time spent in light-to-vigorous physical activity.

ResultsSignificant between-school random variation in objectively measured time spent in light-to-vigorous physical activity was identified σμ0 = 0.067; p < 0.001; school-level differences accounted for 6.7% of the variability in the time individual students spent in light-to-vigorous physical activity. Of the 22 school-level variables, students attending schools with support for active transportation to-from school and written policies-practices for physical activity, accumulated significantly more minutes of physical activity per school week than students who attended schools that did not.

ConclusionsSchool physical activity policy and support for active school travel is associated with objectively measured time spent in light to vigorous physical activity. School physical activity policy might be a critical mechanism through which schools can impact the physical activity levels of their students.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-2049-3258-72-20 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Guy Faulkner - Laura Zeglen - Scott Leatherdale - Steve Manske - Michelle Stone

Source: https://link.springer.com/



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