Gender differences in the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services in Tromsø, Norway are dependent on age: a population-based cross-sectional surveyReport as inadecuate




Gender differences in the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services in Tromsø, Norway are dependent on age: a population-based cross-sectional survey - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

BMC Health Services Research

, 15:477

First Online: 22 October 2015Received: 15 April 2015Accepted: 16 October 2015DOI: 10.1186-s12913-015-1146-z

Cite this article as: Hansen, A.H. & Høye, A. BMC Health Serv Res 2015 15: 477. doi:10.1186-s12913-015-1146-z

Abstract

BackgroundOverall, men are less likely than women to seek health care services for mental health problems, but differences between genders in higher age groups are equivocal. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between gender and the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services in Norway, both in a general population and in a subpopulation with self-reported anxiety and-or depression.

MethodsUsing questionnaires from 12,982 participants 30–87 years in the cross-sectional sixth Tromsø Study 2007-8 we estimated proportions reporting anxiety-depression, and proportions using psychiatric outpatient specialist services in a year. By logistic regressions we studied the association between gender and the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services. Analyses were adjusted for age, marital status, income, education, self-reported degree of anxiety-depression, and GP visits last year. Analyses were also performed for genders separately.

ResultsAnxiety-depression was reported by 21.5 % of women and 12.3 % of men in the general population. Visits to psychiatric outpatient services during one year were reported by 4.6 % of women and 3.3 % of men. The general population’s probability of a visit was significantly lower among men compared to women in ages 30–49 years odds ratio OR 0.58, confidence interval CI 0.39–0.84, p-value p = 0.004, whereas men used services slightly more than women in ages 50 years and over OR 1.36, CI 1.00–1.83, p = 0.047. Among those with anxiety-depression 13.5 % of women and 10.5 % of men visited psychiatric outpatient services in a year. We found no statistically significant gender differences in the use of services in this subgroup. Other factors associated with services use in women with anxiety-depression were higher education, more severe anxiety-depression, and GP visits the last year, whereas in men only a more severe anxiety-depression was associated with psychiatric outpatient visits. Overall, the use of services decreased with higher age.

ConclusionsMost people with self-reported anxiety-depression did not visit specialist outpatient clinics. This applies in particular to men aged 30–49 years, older individuals, and individuals with lower education. Gender differences in the use of services in the general population were dependent on age, whereas in the subgroup with anxiety-depression gender differences were not confirmed.

KeywordsPsychiatric specialist services Mental health care Health care utilisation Cross-sectional study Norway AbbreviationsCIConfidence Interval

EQ-5DEuro Quality of Life Group five Dimensions score scale

GPGeneral Practitioner

NOKNorwegian Kroner

OROdds ratio

pP-value

Tromsø 6The sixth Tromsø Study

USUnited States of America

Download fulltext PDF



Author: Anne Helen Hansen - Anne Høye

Source: https://link.springer.com/







Related documents