The relationship between night work and involuntary weight change: data from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KNHANES 2010–2012Report as inadecuate




The relationship between night work and involuntary weight change: data from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KNHANES 2010–2012 - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

, 28:4

First Online: 29 January 2016Received: 11 June 2015Accepted: 05 January 2016DOI: 10.1186-s40557-016-0088-1

Cite this article as: Kwon, J., Park, JW., Park, JS. et al. Ann of Occup and Environ Med 2016 28: 4. doi:10.1186-s40557-016-0088-1

Abstract

BackgroundPrevious studies on the association between shift or night work and weight change have been focused on finding the risk of weight gain caused by shift or night work. In this study, we aimed to reveal the risk of weight gain and weight loss associated with night work by using a nationwide representative data.

MethodsThis study was performed on 1605 full-time wage workers between the age of 20 and 69 based on the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KNHANES 2010–2012. The association between night work and involuntary weight change in the previous year was divided into the categories of weight gain and weight loss and studied with modifications in socio-demographic variables, health behavior-related variables, and occupational characteristic variables.

ResultsThe participants working in night work accounted for 10.6 % of total study participants male; 11.9 %, female 7.4 %. Workers who worked more than 48 hours per week on average accounted for 41.6 % of the total study participants male; 46.3 %, female 29.1 %.

Odds ratio OR of weight loss associated with night work in male workers was 0.34 95 % confidence interval CI 0.16–0.76 after controlling for several related factors. OR of weight loss associated with night work in female workers with long working hours was 1.95 95 % CI 0.47–80.86 and that of weight gain was 2.83 95 % CI 0.12–69.83 after adjusting associated factors.

ConclusionsIn this cross-sectional study with national representative sample, night work may lower the risk of weight loss in male workers and induce weight change weight loss or weight gain in female workers with long working hours. Therefore, future studies with cohort study design for night workers are needed to reveal the mechanisms and health effects of weight change associated with night work and establish proper management solutions with health and labor policies for Korean night workers.

KeywordsNight work Weight change KNHANES  Download fulltext PDF



Author: Jongho Kwon - Jung-Woo Park - Jin-Soo Park - Seyoung Kim - Hyunrim Choi - Sinye Lim

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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