Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventionsReport as inadecuate




Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventions - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

International Journal for Equity in Health

, 6:6

First Online: 10 July 2007Received: 26 January 2007Accepted: 10 July 2007DOI: 10.1186-1475-9276-6-6

Cite this article as: Casapia, M., Joseph, S.A. & Gyorkos, T.W. Int J Equity Health 2007 6: 6. doi:10.1186-1475-9276-6-6

Abstract

BackgroundCommunities of extreme poverty suffer disproportionately from a wide range of adverse outcomes, but are often neglected or underserved by organized services and research attention. In order to target the first Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty, thereby reducing health inequalities, participatory research in these communities is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the priority problems and respective potential cost-effective interventions in Belen, a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon, using a multidisciplinary and participatory focus.

MethodsTwo multidisciplinary and participatory workshops were conducted with important stakeholders from government, non-government and community organizations, national institutes and academic institutions. In Workshop 1, participants prioritized the main health and health-related problems in the community of Belen. Problem trees were developed to show perceived causes and effects for the top six problems. In Workshop 2, following presentations describing data from recently completed field research in school and household populations of Belen, participants listed potential interventions for the priority problems, including associated barriers, enabling factors, costs and benefits.

ResultsThe top ten priority problems in Belen were identified as: 1 infant malnutrition; 2 adolescent pregnancy; 3 diarrhoea; 4 anaemia; 5 parasites; 6 lack of basic sanitation; 7 low level of education; 8 sexually transmitted diseases; 9 domestic violence; and 10 delayed school entry. Causes and effects for the top six problems, proposed interventions, and factors relating to the implementation of interventions were multidisciplinary in nature and included health, nutrition, education, social and environmental issues.

ConclusionThe two workshops provided valuable insight into the main health and health-related problems facing the community of Belen. The participatory focus of the workshops ensured the active involvement of important stakeholders from Belen. Based on the results of the workshops, effective and essential interventions are now being planned which will contribute to reducing health inequalities in the community.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1475-9276-6-6 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Martin Casapia, Serene A Joseph and Theresa W Gyorkos contributed equally to this work.

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Author: Martin Casapia - Serene A Joseph - Theresa W Gyorkos

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