Impact of Continuous Cropping on the Diurnal Range of Dew Point Temperature during the Foliar Expansion Period of Annual Crops on the Canadian PrairiesReport as inadecuate




Impact of Continuous Cropping on the Diurnal Range of Dew Point Temperature during the Foliar Expansion Period of Annual Crops on the Canadian Prairies - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Advances in Meteorology - Volume 2016 2016, Article ID 5731319, 9 pages -

Research Article

Ottawa Research and Development Centre, 960 Carling Avenue, K. W. Neatby Building, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0C6

Ontario Forest Research Institute, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, 1235 Queen Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada P6A 2E5

Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2

Received 27 June 2015; Revised 5 November 2015; Accepted 8 November 2015

Academic Editor: Li-Liang Ren

Copyright © 2016 Bharat M. Shrestha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

It is important to increase our knowledge of the role of land use in changing the regional climate. This study asked -Has the increase in continuous cropping over the past 50 years on the Canadian Prairies influenced the daily mean and range of morning dew point temperatures during the foliar expansion period from mid-June to mid-July of annual field crops?- We found that there has been a general increase in the decadal average of mean daily and in the range of morning from the 1960s to the 2000s. The increase in the observed range of between the daily minimum value, which typically occurs near sunrise, and the late morning peak was found to be related to the increase in annual crop acreage and consequent decrease in summerfallow area. The relationship was more significant in the subhumid climatic zone than in the semiarid climatic zone, and it was influenced by whether the region was experiencing either wet, normal, or dry conditions.





Author: Bharat M. Shrestha, Richard L. Raddatz, Raymond L. Desjardins, and Devon E. Worth

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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