Socioeconomic inequalities in dental health among middle-aged adults and the role of behavioral and psychosocial factors: evidence from the Spanish National Health SurveyReport as inadecuate




Socioeconomic inequalities in dental health among middle-aged adults and the role of behavioral and psychosocial factors: evidence from the Spanish National Health Survey - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

International Journal for Equity in Health

, 16:34

First Online: 16 February 2017Received: 27 December 2016Accepted: 09 February 2017DOI: 10.1186-s12939-017-0529-7

Cite this article as: Capurro, D.A. & Davidsen, M. Int J Equity Health 2017 16: 34. doi:10.1186-s12939-017-0529-7

Abstract

BackgroundThe goal of this analysis was to describe socioeconomic inequalities in dental health among Spanish middle-aged adults, and the role of behavioral and psychosocial factors in explaining these inequalities.

MethodsThis cross-sectional study used survey data from the 2006 Spanish National Health Survey and focused on adults ages 30 – 64. The outcome was dental health status based on the presence of self-reported dental problems. We used education, income, and occupational class as indicators of socioeconomic position and applied logistic regression analysis to estimate associations. We included behavioral and psychosocial variables in the models and compared non-adjusted to adjusted estimates to assess their potential role in explaining socioeconomic gradients.

ResultsResults showed clear socioeconomic gradients in dental health among middle-aged adults. The percentage of people who reported more dental problems increased among those with lower levels of education, income, and occupation. These gradients were statistically significant p < .001. Logistic regression showed that groups with lower education, income, and occupation had higher odds of reporting the outcome p < .001. Associations were stronger when considering education as the indicator of socioeconomic position. Substantial unexplained associations remained significant after adjusting the model by behavioral and psychosocial variables.

ConclusionsThis study shows significant socioeconomic gradients in dental health among middle-aged adults in Spain. Behavioral and psychosocial variables were insufficient to explain the inequalities described, suggesting the intervention of other factors. Further research should incorporate additional explanations to better understand and comprehensively address socioeconomic inequalities in dental health.

KeywordsSocioeconomic inequalities Dental health Socioeconomic status Oral health Disparities Psychosocial factors Behavior Spain AbbreviationsENSESpanish National Health Survey

SEPSocioeconomic position

OROdds ratios

MIMultiple imputation

Download fulltext PDF



Author: Diego Alberto Capurro - Michael Davidsen

Source: https://link.springer.com/







Related documents