Cardiovascular risk among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal smoking male prisoners: inequalities compared to the wider communityReport as inadecuate




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BMC Public Health

, 11:783

Chronic Disease epidemiology

Abstract

BackgroundCardiovascular risk factors CVRF were collected as part of a randomised controlled trial of a multi-component intervention to reduce smoking among male prisoners. Cross-sectional baseline data on CVRF were compared among smoking male prisoners and males of similar age in the general population.

Methods425 smoking prisoners were recruited n = 407 in New South Wales; 18 in Queensland, including 15% of Aboriginal descent mean age 33 years; median sentence length 3.6 years. We measured CVRF such as smoking, physical activity, blood pressure, risky alcohol use, symptoms of depression, and low socioeconomic status.

ResultsWe found that 39% of prisoners had 3+ CVRF, compared to 10% in a general community sample of most disadvantaged men of a similar age. Significantly more Aboriginal prisoners had 3+ CVRF than non-Aboriginal prisoners 55% vs 36%, p < 0.01 and were twice as likely to have 4+ CVRF 27% vs 12%. In addition to all prisoners in this study being a current smoker with 70% smoking 20+ cigarettes per day, the prevalence of other CVRF was very high: insufficient physical activity 23%; hypertension 4%, risky drinking 52%, symptoms of depression 14% and low socioeconomic status SES 44%. Aboriginal prisoners had higher levels of risky alcohol use, symptoms of depression, and were more likely to be of low SES.

ConclusionPrisoners are at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease compared to even the most disadvantaged in their community and should be the focus of specific public health interventions.

Trial RegistrationThis trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN#12606000229572.

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Author: Robyn L Richmond - Kay A Wilhelm - Devon Indig - Tony G Butler - Vicki A Archer - Alex D Wodak

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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