Implementation of simulation for training minimally invasive surgery*Report as inadecuate




Implementation of simulation for training minimally invasive surgery* - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Tijdschrift voor Medisch Onderwijs

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 206–220

First Online: 01 December 2011DOI: 10.1007-s12507-011-0051-7

Cite this article as: Schreuder, H.W., Oei, S.G., Maas, M. et al. TS MEDISCH ONDERWIJS 2011 30: 206. doi:10.1007-s12507-011-0051-7 gynaecoloog-oncoloog, Alle auteurs zijn lid van de Dutch Society for Simulation in Healthcare DSSH die tegelijkertijd als werkgroep Skills en Simulatietechnieken van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Medisch Onderwijs fungeert

gynaecoloog, Alle auteurs zijn lid van de Dutch Society for Simulation in Healthcare DSSH die tegelijkertijd als werkgroep Skills en Simulatietechnieken van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Medisch Onderwijs fungeert

radioloog, Alle auteurs zijn lid van de Dutch Society for Simulation in Healthcare DSSH die tegelijkertijd als werkgroep Skills en Simulatietechnieken van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Medisch Onderwijs fungeert

internist en prodecaan Onderwijs en Opleiding

chirurg, voorzitter van de Dutch Society for Simulation in Healthcare DSSH.

* Dit artikel verscheen eerder in Med Teach 2011;332:105-115.

Belangenconflict: geen gemeld

Financiële ondersteuning: geen gemeld

Summary

Minimal invasive techniques are rapidly becoming standard of surgical technique for many surgical procedures. To train the skills necessary to apply these techniques, box-trainers and-or inanimate models may be used, but these trainers lack the possibility of inherent objective classification of results. In the last decade virtual reality VR trainers were introduced for training minimal invasive techniques. Minimally Invasive Surgery MIS is, by nature, very suitable for this type of training. The specific psychomotor skills and eye-hand coordination needed for MIS can be mastered largely using VR simulation techniques. It is also possible to transfer skills learned on a simulator to real operations, resulting in error reduction and shortening of procedural operating time. Authors aim to enlighten the process of gaining acceptance in the Netherlands for novel training techniques. The Dutch Societies of Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology each developed individual training curricula for MIS using simulation techniques, to be implemented in daily practice. The ultimate goal is to improve patient safety. The authors outline the opinions of actors involved such as: different simulators, surgical trainees, surgeons, surgical societies, hospital boards, government and the public. The actual implementation of nationwide training curricula for MIS is, however, a challenging step. Schreuder HWR, Oei G, Maas M, Borleffs JCC, Schijven MP. Implementation of simulation for traning minimally invasive surgery. Netherlands Journal of Medical Education 2011;305: 206-220.

Download fulltext PDF



Author: Henk W.R. Schreuder - S Guid Oei - Mario Maas - Jan C.C. Borleffs - Marlies P. Schijven

Source: https://link.springer.com/



DOWNLOAD PDF




Related documents