Effects of Non-hydrocarbon Liquids on Particulate Emissions of FlaresReport as inadecuate




Effects of Non-hydrocarbon Liquids on Particulate Emissions of Flares - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

non-hydrocarbon liquid, sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, particle emission, flare, distilled water, emission factor

Kazemimanesh, Mohsen

Supervisor and department: Olfert, Jason Mechanical engineering Kostiuk, Larry Mechanical engineering

Examining committee member and department: Martin, Andrew Mechanical engineering Olfert, Jason Mechanical engineering Kostiuk, Larry Mechanical engineering

Department: Department of Mechanical Engineering

Specialization:

Date accepted: 2014-07-03T14:37:00Z

Graduation date: 2014-11

Degree: Master of Science

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: To investigate the effects of non-hydrocarbon liquids found in the produced water following fracturing operations on particulate emissions of flares, a small-scale experiment with methane diffusion flame was used. Size distributions, mass-mobility relationships, effective density, volatility, and elemental analysis of particulate emissions from unseeded and seeded flames were obtained. To mimic real flaring, another pilot-scale experiment using a 2-in. diameter burner with a methane-based turbulent diffusion flame with flow conditions and fuel composition typical of flares in the petroleum industry was used. Particle morphology was determined using Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM. Particle size distributions, soot volume fractions, and emission factors were obtained using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer SMPS and Laser-Induced Incandescence LII. The results showed that emission factor depended on the liquid mass ratio. Distilled water and HCl solution decreased emission factor. Emission factor was orders of magnitude higher for NaCl-doped flames; however, majority of particles were NaCl and soot emission was suppressed in this case.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R33R0Q24W

Rights: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Author: Kazemimanesh, Mohsen

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Teaser



Effects of Non-hydrocarbon Liquids on Particulate Emissions of Flares by Mohsen Kazemimanesh A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Alberta © Mohsen Kazemimanesh, 2014 Abstract To investigate the effects of non-hydrocarbon liquids found in the produced water following fracturing operations on particulate emissions of flares, a small-scale experiment with methane diffusion flame was used.
Size distributions, massmobility relationships, effective density, volatility, and elemental analysis of particulate emissions from unseeded and seeded flames were obtained.
To mimic real flaring, another pilot-scale experiment using a 2-in.
diameter burner with a methane-based turbulent diffusion flame with flow conditions and fuel composition typical of flares in the petroleum industry was used.
Particle morphology was determined using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Particle size distributions, soot volume fractions, and emission factors were obtained using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII).
The results showed that emission factor depended on the liquid mass ratio.
Distilled water and HCl solution decreased emission factor. Emission factor was orders of magnitude higher for NaCl-doped flames; however, majority of particles were NaCl and soot emission was suppressed in this case. ii Preface Some of the research conducted for the Chapter 3 of this thesis was conducted in collaboration with Energy and Emissions Research Lab at Carleton University. The flare facility used in Chapter 3 was designed and constructed by Dr.
Matthew Johnson and Darcy Corbin; however, the burner and liquid delivery and generation system was designed by myself.
The flare facility at Carleton University was operated by Darcy Corbin for the course of this research.
He also operated the LII and FTIR gas analyzer to measure soot volume fractio...





Related documents