Availability and utilization of the WHO recommended priority lifesaving medicines for under five-year old children in public health facilities in Uganda: a cross-sectional surveyReport as inadecuate




Availability and utilization of the WHO recommended priority lifesaving medicines for under five-year old children in public health facilities in Uganda: a cross-sectional survey - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice

, 8:18

First Online: 11 May 2015Received: 07 January 2015Accepted: 28 April 2015DOI: 10.1186-s40545-015-0038-2

Cite this article as: Nsabagasani, X., Ogwal-Okeng, J., Mbonye, A. et al. J of Pharm Policy and Pract 2015 8: 18. doi:10.1186-s40545-015-0038-2

Abstract

ObjectivesTo explore the availability and utilization of the World Health Organization WHO recommended priority life-saving medicines for children under five in public health facilities in Uganda.

MethodsWe conducted a cross sectional survey in 32 lower level public facilities in Jinja district of Uganda. A proportionate number of facilities were randomly selected in each stratum following a hierarchy of Health Centers HC defined according to the level of care they provide: 17 HC IIs, 10 HC IIIs and 5 HC IVs. In the facilities, we verified the availability of the WHO recommended priority medicines for diarrhea, sepsis, pneumonia and malaria. 81 health workers from the facilities reported what they prescribed for children with the above diseases.

ResultsOral rehydration salt ORS and zinc sulphate dispersible tablets for diarrhea were available in all HC IIs and IIIs and in only 60% of HC IVs. Procaine benzyl penicillin injection powder for treatment of sepsis was available in the majority of all HCs with: 100% of HC of IVs, 83% of HC IIIs and 82% of HC IIs. Medicines for pneumonia were limited across all the HCs with: Amoxicillin dispersible tablets in only 30% of the HC IIs and 40% of the HC IVs. The most uncommon were child-friendly priority medicines for malaria with: Artesunate injection in only 6% of HC IIs, 14% of HC IIIs and 20% of HC IVs; Artemether lumefantrine dispersible tablets and rectal artesunate were missing in all the 32 HCs. Less than a third of the health workers reported prescribing zinc sulphate and ORS for diarrhea, 86% reported procaine benzyl penicillin injection powder for sepsis, and 57% reported amoxicillin dispersible tablets for pneumonia. None reported prescribing Artemether lumefantrine dispersible tablets and rectal artesunate for malaria.

ConclusionsThere is low availability and utilization of life-saving priority medicines for pneumonia and malaria in public health facilities in Uganda. However, the priority medicines for diarrhea and sepsis are available and highly prescribed by the health workers.

KeywordsLifesaving priority medicines Children under five Public health facilities Uganda Xavier Nsabagasani, Jasper Ogwal-Okeng, Anthony Mbonye, Freddie Ssengooba, Simon Muhumuza and Ebba Holme Hansen contributed equally to this work.

Download fulltext PDF



Author: Xavier Nsabagasani - Jasper Ogwal-Okeng - Anthony Mbonye - Freddie Ssengooba - Simon Muhumuza - Ebba Holme Hansen

Source: https://link.springer.com/







Related documents