A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo studyReport as inadecuate




A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo study - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

BMC Public Health

, 15:548

First Online: 12 June 2015Received: 18 December 2014Accepted: 29 May 2015DOI: 10.1186-s12889-015-1892-1

Cite this article as: Hassan, N., Ho, W.K., Mariapun, S. et al. BMC Public Health 2015 15: 548. doi:10.1186-s12889-015-1892-1

Abstract

BackgroundTo date, because of limited budgets and lower incidence of breast cancer, the majority of Asian countries do not have population-based screening programmes, but instead offer opportunistic screening. However, there have been few studies which have assessed the motivators for women attending such programmes and the appropriateness of the programmes in terms of targeting women at risk.

MethodsWe conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 1,619 women aged 40 to 74 years attending a subsidized opportunistic screening mammogram from October 2011 to October 2013 at a private hospital in Malaysia. Breast cancer risk was estimated using the Gail Model and two-step cluster analysis was used to examine the motivators of attending screening.

ResultsAlthough Malaysia comprises 54.5 % Malay, 24.5 % Chinese and 7.3 % Indian, the majority of women in the MyMammo Study were Chinese 70.1 % and 99.2 % had a <2 % ten-year risk of breast cancer. The most commonly cited barriers were the perception of not being at risk and fear of painful mammography. We found that highly educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators. Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors.

ConclusionsTaken together, our results suggest the women attending opportunistic mammography screening in Asia are at low risk of breast cancer and this poses challenges to cost-effective and equitable strategies for cancer control. We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

KeywordsMammography Screening Breast Cancer Malaysia Asia  Download fulltext PDF



Author: Norhashimah Hassan - Weang Kee Ho - Shivaani Mariapun - Soo Hwang Teo

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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