Too Much Fun for Therapy: Therapeutic Recreation as an Intervention Tool with At-Risk Youth. A Series of Solutions and Strategies.Report as inadecuate




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This publication introduces the concept of therapeutic recreation (TR), illustrating its natural fit into the educational process and its use with at-risk students, and providing resources for further use. Section 1 examines what places a child at risk, focusing on educational goals, student behaviors, and home life. Section 2 defines TR as a professional service that assists people with disabilities and other limitations to be able to achieve an enhanced lifestyle that encompasses functional independence, health, and well-being. Section 3 explains how TR fits into the school setting, noting that recreation in the school setting can be found in four different modes (to teach, to reinforce, to motivate, and to reward). Section 4 discusses TR intervention activities, including horticultural therapy, stress management, creative arts therapies, humor intervention therapy, and outdoor adventure therapy and wilderness programs. For each activity, the publication presents information on targeted goals and benefits, cautions and comments, sample program profiles, and program contacts. Two sidebars offer information on risk factors (related to educational goals, student behaviors, and home life) and protective factors that provide support for the enhancement of resilience. (SM)

Descriptors: Academic Failure, Creative Art, Early Intervention, Elementary Secondary Education, Family Life, High Risk Students, Horticulture, Humor, Outdoor Activities, Stress Management, Student Behavior, Student Motivation, Therapeutic Recreation, Wilderness

National Dropout Prevention Center at Clemson University, College of Health, Education and Human Development, 205 Martin Street, Clemson, SC 29634-0726. Tel: 864-656-2599; e-mail: ndpc[at]clemson.edu; Web site: http://www.dropoutprevention.org.









Author: Brooks, Katherine Walker

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=11636&id=ED460948



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