Doctoral Training in Counseling Psychology: Evidence for Value AddedReport as inadecuate




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This document reviews both favorable and unfavorable evidence that relates training and experience to therapist behavior and therapy outcomes. It also discusses implications for the MA versus PhD/PsyD practitioner debate. At issue is the "value added" (if any) of the doctorate for clinical practitioners. This value added is examined for the recipients of psychological services as well as the benefit for practitioners. The data provide interesting comparisons between master's and doctoral graduates and practitioners. The current university training programs include an extensive and expensive system of training and education producing practitioners at the doctoral level that appear to compete with what is also produced at the master's level. There is not enough evidence to support the conclusion that doctoral-level psychologists are superior to master's graduates in most respects. Neither are there data suggesting that doctoral-level psychologists are warmer, more sensitive, or more empathic than lesser-trained folks. Research is still needed to determine whether the added training received through a doctoral program leads to researchers; scholars; or professors with stronger skills. (Contains 1 table and 38 references.) (ADT)

Descriptors: Competence, Counseling Effectiveness, Counseling Psychology, Counselor Training, Doctoral Degrees, Higher Education, Masters Degrees, Outcomes of Treatment, Professional Training, Research Needs











Author: Lichtenberg, James W.; McPherson, Robert H.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=11579&id=ED451433



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