Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley fever vaccine in mice.Report as inadecuate




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Reference: Warimwe, GM, Lorenzo, G, Lopez-Gil, E et al., (2013). Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley fever vaccine in mice. Virology journal, 10 (1), 349.Citable link to this page:

 

Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley fever vaccine in mice.

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that historically affects livestock production and human health in sub-Saharan Africa, though epizootics have also occurred in the Arabian Peninsula. Whilst an effective live-attenuated vaccine is available for livestock, there is currently no licensed human RVF vaccine. Replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus (ChAd) vectors are an ideal platform for development of a human RVF vaccine, given the low prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against them in the human population, and their excellent safety and immunogenicity profile in human clinical trials of vaccines against a wide range of pathogens. METHODS: Here, in BALB/c mice, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAdOx1, encoding the RVF virus envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which are targets of virus neutralizing antibodies. The ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine was assessed in comparison to a replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector encoding Gn and Gc (HAdV5-GnGc), a strategy previously shown to confer protective immunity against RVF in mice. RESULTS: A single immunization with either of the vaccines conferred protection against RVF virus challenge eight weeks post-immunization. Both vaccines elicited RVF virus neutralizing antibody and a robust CD8+ T cell response. CONCLUSIONS: Together the results support further development of RVF vaccines based on replication-deficient adenovirus vectors, with ChAdOx1-GnGc being a potential candidate for use in future human clinical trials.

Peer Review status:Peer reviewedPublication status:PublishedVersion:Publisher's versionNotes:Copyright © 2013 Warimwe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the CreativeCommons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, andreproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedicationwaiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwisestated.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: BioMed Central

Publisher Website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/

Journal: Virology journalsee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.virologyj.com/

Issue Date: 2013

Article Number:ARTN 349

pages:349Identifiers

Urn: uuid:4b2be378-7381-4c19-ac22-a5933abf63ba

Source identifier: 441764

Eissn: 1743-422X

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-422x-10-349

Issn: 1743-422X Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes Animals Mice, Inbred BALB C Mice Adenoviridae Rift Valley fever virus Rift Valley Fever Disease Models, Animal Vaccines, Synthetic Vaccines, Attenuated Viral Vaccines Antibodies, Viral Drug Carriers Genetic Vectors Female Antibodies, Neutralizing Tiny URL: pubs:441764

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Author: Warimwe, GM - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MSD, NDM, Jenner Institute grantNumber098635-B-12-Z fundingWellcome Trust -

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:4b2be378-7381-4c19-ac22-a5933abf63ba



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