The Relative Importance of Different Psychological Approaches for Teaching: Implications for the Quality of Education.Report as inadecuate




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This study sought to determine student perceptions of the relative importance of three approaches toward teaching in the classroom: behaviorist, cognitive, and humanist. A survey of 320 students studying in 4 different schools (social sciences, humanities, engineering, and administration/business management) of a university found some similarities among the schools regarding the relative importance. Each school considered the items belonging to the cognitive approach as having the most relative importance, followed by the humanist and behaviorist approach items. The relative importance means were greater for the schools of administration/business management and social sciences than for other schools. The number of cognitive and humanist items showing statistically significant differences in relative importance was greater for students in their first semesters of college than for students in their last semesters. The study concludes that each student probably evaluates teaching according to his or her perception of the ideal strategy, and this evaluation is different from that made by other students. An appendix provides a copy of the survey instrument. (JDD)

Descriptors: Behaviorism, Business Administration Education, Cognitive Structures, College Students, Educational Quality, Engineering Education, Higher Education, Humanistic Education, Humanities Instruction, Instructional Effectiveness, Psychoeducational Methods, Social Sciences, Student Attitudes, Student Evaluation of Teacher Performance, Student Reaction, Teaching Methods











Author: Garduno-Estrada, Leon R.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=11220&id=ED375083







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