Directionless from Birth: The National Council for the Social Studies, 1921-1937.Report as inadecuate




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This paper recounts the early years of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), from its 1921 beginnings and partnership with the National Education Association. NCSS began as a service organization to close the gap between social scientists and secondary school teachers and to reexamine knowledge within the disciplines in light of potential use in schools. NCSS was founded by five practitioner-researchers, but the organization was taken over by two hard working entrepreneurs with little vision other than an organizing spirit. NCSS emerged directionless from birth. Many in higher education with deep interest in the social sciences and professional organizations became very interested in NCSS and its influence in the school curriculum. These alliances allowed for the Council to meet on neutral ground. NCSS allied early with the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Historical Association (AHA). Although it was never a formal part of the AHA, the AHA provided financial support for many years. From 1925 to 1969, NCSS was officially part of NEA as its Department of Social Studies. For the first 10 years, NCSS campaigned for members to give it life. By the late 1920s NCSS had begun to gain the interest of teachers; by the 1930s the Council attracted educators and social scientists with more pronounced academic views and involvement. NCSS had a few women officers in the early years but many were involved with Committees and Yearbook chapters. This history laments that little has changed in the nearly 60 years as NCSS still struggles for acceptance, membership, intellectual respect, and a political voice in the debate on schools. (EH)

Descriptors: Educational History, Elementary Secondary Education, Faculty Organizations, History, National Organizations, Professional Associations, Social History, Social Science Research, Social Studies, Teacher Associations











Author: Nelson, Murry R.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=11043&id=ED391706



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