A Comparative Study on the Child and Family Effects of Adding a Parent Involvement Program to an Existing Early Intervention Program.Report as inadecuate




A Comparative Study on the Child and Family Effects of Adding a Parent Involvement Program to an Existing Early Intervention Program. - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.





In order to increase statistical power, this study combined the data of three previous studies on the role of parent involvement in early intervention for children with disabilities. Each of the studies found a mixed pattern of positive results on child outcomes and, in two of the studies, on family outcomes. The combined subjects (n=181) had mild to severe disabilities, an average chronological age of 48 months, and an average developmental age of 29 months. Parents participated in 15 or 16 small group sessions facilitated by program support staff and organized around the Parents Involved in Education curriculum. Classroom teachers were only minimally aware of the goals and activities of the parent involvement program. The combined study data indicate that the supplemental parent involvement component had a small impact on children's developmental progress immediately after the intervention but effect size was small (average only .18). On family outcome measures only one statistically significant difference was found--in perceptions of family social support. Results raise questions regarding the efficacy of this form of parent involvement. (Contains 16 references.) (DB)

Descriptors: Child Development, Disabilities, Early Intervention, Evaluation Methods, Family Programs, Group Discussion, Meta Analysis, Parent Education, Parent Participation, Preschool Children, Preschool Education, Program Effectiveness, Program Evaluation, Social Support Groups











Author: Innocenti, Mark S.; And Others

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=10497&id=ED358596







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