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Reference: Morimoto Borges, JM and Wigby, S, (2016). Differential effects of male nutrient balance on pre- and post-copulatory traits, and consequences for female reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. Scientific Reports, 6, Article: 27673.Citable link to this page:

 

Differential effects of male nutrient balance on pre- and post-copulatory traits, and consequences for female reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster

Abstract: Male fitness depends on the expression of costly traits involved in obtaining mates (pre-copulatory) and fertilization (post-copulatory). However, very little is known about the nutrient requirements for these traits and whether males compromise their diet to maximize one trait at the expense of another. Here we used Nutritional Geometry to investigate macronutrient requirements for pre- and post-copulatory traits in Drosophila, when males were the first or second to mate with females. We found no significant effects of male diet on sperm competitiveness. However, although males self-regulate their macronutrient intake at a protein-to-carbohydrate ratio (“P:C ratio”) of 1:1.5, this ratio does not coincide with their optima for several key reproductive traits: both the short-term (~24 hr) rate of offspring production after a female’s first mating, as well as the total offspring number sired when males were second to mate were maximized at a P:C ratio of 1:9, whereas male attractiveness (latency to mate), were maximised at a P:C ratio of 1:1. These results suggest a compromised optimum diet, and no single diet that simultaneously maximizes all male reproductive traits. The protein intake of first males also negatively affected female offspring production following remating, suggesting a long-term intersexual effect of male nutrition.

Peer Review status:Peer reviewedPublication status:PublishedVersion:Publisher's versionNotes:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

Publisher Website: http://www.nature.com/

Journal: Scientific Reportssee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.nature.com/srep/

Issue Date: 2016

pages:Article: 27673Identifiers

Urn: uuid:aa35ce3d-e402-4fee-a246-6261e245888f

Source identifier: 626978

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep27673

Issn: 2045-2322 Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: animal behaviour behavioural ecology entomology feeding behaviour sexual selection Tiny URL: pubs:626978

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Author: Morimoto Borges, JM - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MPLS, Zoology fundingConselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científi

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:aa35ce3d-e402-4fee-a246-6261e245888f



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