Fostering Educational Resilience in Inner-City Schools. Publication Series No. 4.Report as inadecuate




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This paper provides an overview of the research base on fostering educational resilience among children whose circumstances place them at risk of educational failure-- particularly in inner-city communities. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide an overview of the research base on fostering educational resilience among children whose circumstances place them at risk of educational failure and (2) to describe educational practices that are resilience-promoting and their implications for student development and learning success. A previous research synthesis (M. Wang, G. Haertel, and H. Walberg, 1994) identified 7 characteristics of the learner and 22 characteristics of the home, classroom, and community contexts that influence student learning. The research base of studies on each of these context categories is discussed. Findings from a long-term program of research on resilience development at the National Center on Education in the Inner Cities, a program that encompasses a range of studies, show characteristics of resilient learners and characteristics of inner-city classrooms that promote educational resilience. Enabling conditions that result in high levels of student engagement include an orderly and safe campus, student-centered and highly responsive classroom learning environments with well-structured classroom management systems, site-specific and ongoing professional development, and parents with high educational aspirations for their children. Findings from a recent meta-analysis support inclusive practices for children with special needs. The restructuring of curriculum and service delivery, combined with the creation of inclusive, stable, supportive learning environments, and increased access to family, school, and community resources can promote the healthy development and learning success of students at risk of school failure. (Contains 1 table, 1 figure, and 35 references.) (SLD)

Descriptors: Disadvantaged Youth, Diversity (Student), Educational Research, Elementary Secondary Education, Family Relationship, High Risk Students, Inner City, Peer Relationship, Resilience (Personality), Self Esteem, Teacher Expectations of Students, Teaching Methods, Urban Schools, Urban Youth

Electronic version: http://www.temple.edu/LSS









Author: Wang, Margaret C.; Haertel, Geneva D.; Walberg, Herbert J.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=10448&id=ED419856







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