Low emotional response to traumatic footage is associated with an absence of analogue flashbacks: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 16 trauma film paradigm experiments.Report as inadecuate




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Reference: Clark, IA, Mackay, CE and Holmes, EA, (2014). Low emotional response to traumatic footage is associated with an absence of analogue flashbacks: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 16 trauma film paradigm experiments. Cognition and Emotion, 29 (4), 702-713.Citable link to this page:

 

Low emotional response to traumatic footage is associated with an absence of analogue flashbacks: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 16 trauma film paradigm experiments.

Abstract: Most people will experience or witness a traumatic event. A common occurrence after trauma is the experience of involuntary emotional memories of the traumatic event, herewith flashbacks. Some individuals, however, report no flashbacks. Prospective work investigating psychological factors associated with an absence of flashbacks is lacking. We performed an individual participant data meta-analysis on 16 experiments (n = 458) using the trauma film paradigm to investigate the association of emotional response to traumatic film footage and commonly collected baseline characteristics (trait anxiety, current depression, trauma history) with an absence of analogue flashbacks. An absence of analogue flashbacks was associated with low emotional response to the traumatic film footage and, to a lesser extent, low trait anxiety and low current depression levels. Trauma history and recognition memory for the film were not significantly associated with an absence of analogue flashbacks. Understanding why some individuals report an absence of flashbacks may aid preventative treatments against flashback development.

Peer Review status:Peer reviewedPublication status:PublishedVersion:Publisher's versionNotes:Copyright © 2014 The Author(s). Published by Taylor and Francis. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the CreativeCommons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, andreproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The moral rights of the named author(s) have beenasserted.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Routledge

Publisher Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/

Journal: Cognition and Emotionsee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/pcem20

Issue Date: 2014-06

pages:702-713Identifiers

Urn: uuid:be86e6b3-d5ba-4b5b-8b8a-80a3a6b889df

Source identifier: 469568

Eissn: 1464-0600

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2014.926861

Issn: 0269-9931 Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: Flashbacks Intrusions Mental imagery Peritraumatic emotions Trauma film paradigm Tiny URL: pubs:469568

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Author: Clark, IA - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MSD, Psychiatry - - - Mackay, CE - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MS

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:be86e6b3-d5ba-4b5b-8b8a-80a3a6b889df



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