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Reference: Jan Fullerton, Matthew Cubin, Hemant Tiwari et al., (2003). Linkage analysis of extremely discordant and concordant sibling pairs identifies quantitative-trait loci that influence variation in the human personality trait neuroticism. American Journal of Human Genetics, 72 (4), 879-890.Citable link to this page:

 

Linkage analysis of extremely discordant and concordant sibling pairs identifies quantitative-trait loci that influence variation in the human personality trait neuroticism

Abstract: Several theoretical studies have suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained siblings can be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. Here, we report a genetic linkage scan using extremely discordant and concordant sibling pairs, selected from 34,580 sibling pairs in the southwest of England who completed a personality questionnaire. We performed a genomewide scan for quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) that influence variation in the personality trait of neuroticism, or emotional stability, and we established genomewide empirical significance thresholds by simulation. The maximum pointwise P values, expressed as the negative logarithm (base 10), were found on 1q (3.95), 4q (3.84), 7p (3.90), 12q (4.74), and 13q (3.81). These five loci met or exceeded the 5% genomewide significance threshold of 3.8 (negative logarithm of the P value). QTLs on chromosomes 1, 12, and 13 are likely to be female specific. One locus, on chromosome 1, is syntenic with that reported from QTL mapping of rodent emotionality, an animal model of neuroticism, suggesting that some animal and human QTLs influencing emotional stability may be homologous.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's version Funder: Wellcome Trust   Notes:Citation: Fullerton, J. et al. (2003). Linkage analysis of extremely discordant and concordant sibling pairs identifies quantitative-trait loci that influence variation in the human personality trait neuroticism. American Journal of Human Genetics [Online], 72 (4), 879-890. [Available at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/].

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: The American Society of Human Genetics

Publisher Website: http://genetics.faseb.org/genetics/ashg/ashgmenu.htm

Host: American Journal of Human Geneticssee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/

Issue Date: 2003-April

Copyright Date: 2003

pages:879-890Identifiers

Issn: 0002-9297

Urn: uuid:c16e3469-900b-4641-b942-59291ecc4355 Item Description

Type: Article: post-print;

Language: en

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: neuroticism genetic linkage study sibling pairs quantitative-state lociSubjects: Genetics (medical sciences) Psychiatry Tiny URL: ora:1035

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Author: Jan Fullerton - institutionUniversity of Oxford facultyMedical Sciences Division - Clinical Medicine,Nuffield Department of - Wel

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:c16e3469-900b-4641-b942-59291ecc4355



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