Incidence Rates of Sexual Harassment in Mass Communications Internship Programs: An Initial Study Comparing Intern, Student, and Professional Rates.Report as inadecuate




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A study documented, using a telephone survey, the incidence rates of sexual harassment of mass communication interns, and compared those rates to student and professional rates. A probability sample of 44 male and 52 female mass communications professionals was generated using several random sampling techniques from among professionals who work in Tampa, Florida and who completed a mass communication internship program while an undergraduate or graduate student. Results indicated that (1) the percentage of respondents who reported experiencing at least one form of sexual harassment in their roles as students, interns, and professionals were 32%, 49%, and 65% respectively; (2) the majority of self-reported incidents of sexual harassment were most often minor; (3) the hypothesis that more individuals would be harassed as interns than as students or professionals received some support; (4) women experienced more incidents of sexual harassment than men in all three roles, but the difference was only statistically significant for professionals; (5) males were more often the perpetrators of sexual harassment than females; and (6) some support was found for the hypothesis that victims of sexual harassment viewed the overall quality of their student, intern, and professional experience more negatively than those who were not sexually harassed. Findings suggest that sexual harassment is not an infrequent occurrence in internship programs. (Contains 42 references and 16 tables of data.) (RS)

Descriptors: College Students, Communication Research, Comparative Analysis, Higher Education, Internship Programs, Interpersonal Communication, Mass Media, Sex Differences, Sexual Harassment, Surveys











Author: Bowen, Michelle; Laurion, Suzanne

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=10185&id=ED374485



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