Take Charge of Your Enrollment: Improving Enrollment Management through Policy Analysis.Report as inadecuate




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As student bodies become more diverse and student needs multiply, institutions may find recruitment and retention increasingly challenging tasks. Effective enrollment management can introduce some stability and predictability into the planning context, with the promise of increased efficiency and effectiveness in meeting both student and institutional goals. Successful enrollment management depends on an information base that is comprehensive, targeted, and continuously updated, to inform enrollment management policies, and to monitor their effectiveness. Adopted in its entirety, this approach: (1) establishes a framework for studying student college interaction; (2) encourages development of enrollment targets, performance monitoring systems, and longitudinal tracking; (3) identifies areas of student behavior where institutional understanding is weak; (4) integrates research into enrollment management policy; and (5) promotes continuous improvement using the data, analysis, and policy (DAP) cycle. To illustrate the application of the DAP cycle, this paper describes three examples of enrollment management policy analysis and revisions. The first example, involving the use of institutional financial aid in a selective admissions environment, is a classic enrollment management problem at liberal arts colleges. The other examples illustrate the wide applicability of the framework focusing on minority student retention and continuing education recruitment at a large, open-admission community college. (KP)

Descriptors: Community Colleges, Continuing Education, Enrollment Management, Minority Groups, Policy Analysis, School Holding Power, Student Financial Aid, Student Recruitment, Two Year Colleges











Author: Clagett, Craig A.; Kerr, Helen S.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=10043&id=ED374875







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