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Reference: Schultz, MK, (2013). A case study on the appropriateness of using quick response (QR) codes in libraries and museums. Library and Information Science Research, 35 (3), 207-215.Citable link to this page:

 

A case study on the appropriateness of using quick response (QR) codes in libraries and museums

Abstract: Libraries and museums are increasingly looking to mobile technologies, including quick response (QR) codes, to better serve their visitors and achieve their overall institutional goals; however, there is a lack of information regarding patrons' perceptions of QR codes - information essential to successful implementations. This case study explored staff members' and patrons' perceptions of QR codes at Ryerson University Library and the Museum of Inuit Art in order to determine the extent to which QR codes are appropriate for use in libraries and museums. Observations and 56 patron and staff interviews were conducted to obtain data on usage, knowledge, reactions and expectations regarding QR codes in these institutions. It was found that QR code usage was low, but that there was potential for use, with patrons' reactions being generally positive. Three themes were identified from an analysis of the results: an assumption that young people and smartphone owners use QR codes; that QR codes are only used for one-way provision of information, not to initiate a conversation; and that QR codes can be used to personalize a visit to an institution. Libraries and museums are advised that based on these findings, QR codes can provide a cost effective and potentially powerful tool, but patrons should be first surveyed to tailor these initiatives to their wants and needs. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

Peer Review status:Peer reviewedPublication status:PublishedVersion:Accepted ManuscriptNotes:Copyright 2013 Elsevier. All rights reserved.This is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in Library and Information Science Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Library and Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3, July 2013, Pages 207-215, DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2013.03.002

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Elsevier B.V.

Publisher Website: http://www.elsevier.com/

Journal: Library and Information Science Researchsee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/07408188

Issue Date: 2013-7

pages:207-215Identifiers

Urn: uuid:e9033b5e-d4ca-40c2-a1b4-8edd833f481e

Source identifier: 440074

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2013.03.002

Issn: 0740-8188 Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Language: eng

Version: Accepted Manuscript Tiny URL: pubs:440074

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Author: Schultz, MK - - - - Bibliographic Details Publisher: Elsevier B.V. - Publisher Website: http:-www.elsevier.com- - - Journal: Libr

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:e9033b5e-d4ca-40c2-a1b4-8edd833f481e



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